Teacher appreciation

 



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It makes sense to do so, that way they know what good job they are doing.”

 


It comes with great importance to know that appreciating teachers is more important than we think, states a survey by Gallup on May 8, 2017.

Gallup survey shows that only a few of teachers have been recognized for good work. Within all the teachers we have had in our scholarly years, 29% of the teachers agree with the statement “In the last seven days, I have received recognition or praise for doing good work.”

“I don’t thank my teachers or show them my appreciation. I feel bad knowing now I should thank them for their hard work, especially when they take time out of their day to help me with my problems.” Say Brian Garcia, a DeAnza college student, majoring in business.

Students do not show appreciation out of hatred or because they do not like the teacher, but because most students forget to thank them. Praising someone for their good work increases the self-esteem of ourselves, as you can remember the times someone else has praised your work.

DeAnza student, Alexis Maza, is a nursing major and she states that she often does show appreciation towards her teachers, but not all of them.

Maza says she stays connected to the teachers that have helped her with big steps that help her get closer to her goals. “I visit my favorite teachers from here and there to show them how I am in life, and to thank them for being by my side.”

Not all students have the opportunity to talk to their teacher face-to-face. Some students never thank their teachers at all.

“I’m rarely here at DeAnza because I mostly take online classes. It’s kinda pointless to thank someone who you don’t really interact with in person.” Says another DeAnza student, Ivonne Chavez, who is also majoring in nursing.

Appreciating teachers is more important than we think. Gallup research shows that consistent recognition for doing good work has an influence as to how the teachers perform in school.

In the studies, it is proven to say that teachers who receive regular recognition and praise:
– are more productive
– are more engaged at work
– are more likely to receive higher satisfaction scores from students and parents.

Failing to recognize teachers performance, also puts the schools potential in line. Praising teachers for hard work is an easy win for them considering all their budget cuts because giving a compliment is free.

“I like to interact with my professors so they would get to know me better. Having that connection with them helps teachers know how to teach us better. I always like to thank them for helping me with every single question I have. I can be a handful sometimes!” Says Maria Dominguez, a student that attends DeAnza college and is majoring in kinesiology.

“I never thought about it. Now that I think about it, I do not say thank you to my teachers. It makes sense to do so, that way they know what good job they are doing.” Said by DeAnza student, Ivana Balistreri, whom has an undeclared major.

Students do not realize how important it is to say a thank you at the end of a class period. Many students are busy with their own crazy schedule, that it does not cross their mind to praise their teacher for their time.

Two out of the five people interviewed at Deanza college said they do show some appreciation to their teachers and do let them know what good job they are doing.

Gallup’s study shows that for teachers to perform better in school, recognition must require two things: it must be individualized and frequent. Administrators must create a “recognition-rich environment” which means praise coming from all directions.

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Last day of high school with favorite teacher
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